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Putting Anger to Bed!

Updated: Nov 4, 2021

Read Ephesians 4:1–6:24

22 Throw off your old sinful nature and your former way of life, which is

corrupted by lust and deception.  23 Instead, let the Spirit renew your thoughts

and attitudes.  24 Put on your new nature, created to be like God—truly

righteous and holy.  25 So stop telling lies. Let us tell our neighbors the truth, for

we are all parts of the same body.  26 And “don’t sin by letting anger control

you.” Don’t let the sun go down while you are still angry,  27 for anger gives a

foothold to the devil.  28 If you are a thief, quit stealing. Instead, use your hands

for good hard work, and then give generously to others in need.  29 Don’t use

foul or abusive language. Let everything you say be good and helpful, so that

your words will be an encouragement to those who hear them.  30 And do not

bring sorrow to God’s Holy Spirit by the way you live. Ephesians 4:22-30

The popularity of conflict resolution has put a damper on old-fashioned, red-eyed anger. Ranting, raving, and name-calling have almost become felonies

today.

Despite this recent trend, conflict resolution is really nothing new. It has been

around for a long time, even before Paul wrote his letter to the Ephesians.

That is why Paul is able to give great advice in his letter for dealing with one of

the main ingredients of conflict—anger. What stirs your temper?

In addition to handling anger, Paul also warns the Ephesians against illicit sex

and smooth talkers who peddle fancy religious ideas. He also gives family

members advice on how to relate to each other.

Anger is a dangerous emotion, “for anger gives a foothold to the Devil”

(Ephesians 4:27). The Bible, however, does not tell us to avoid being angry

but to avoid nursing our anger (4:26-27). When we respond in anger to a

situation, we sin by choosing the destructive alternative to the problem. We

also open ourselves up to developing a pattern of sinful behavior that may

include physical abuse and verbal attacks. If we nurse our anger into a

grudge, we will become bitter, which can negatively affect all our

relationships—especially the one we have with God.

Learn to control your anger without letting it rule you. When you are angry

confess your feelings to God, and ask him to help you respond to the situation

as Christ would. When you are angry, follow Paul’s advice and resolve your conflict before the sun goes down (4:26). Let God, not your anger, determine how you act.





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